The March on Washington: Revolution and Change for Today

civil rights movement

The March on Washington was revolutionary because of three reasons: it was the defining moment that brought international awareness to the black struggle in America, it established Dr. Martin Luther King, who introduced his famous “I Have a Dream Speech, “as the undisputed leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and the event representing the pinnacle of black unity.

The Black Struggle: International Awareness

Bringing attention to the Civil Rights Movement was the goal of the March on Washington. The overwhelming obstacles and challenges established by the unfair rules and regulations of White Americans hindered the potential for black progress and freedom.  Life for black people was filled with segregation, poverty, discrimination and a constant state of fear.

In places such as Mississippi and Birmingham Alabama, an extreme danger existed for African Americans at every turn. Blacks were still getting beaten, shot and lynched without any hope of justice from the white legal system.

racial tension

The march on Washington brought shameful awareness on the unlawful issues perpetrated by people who had no respect for the part of humanity different from themselves.

Dr. Martin Luther King’s, “I Have a Dream Speech”

Many great speakers spoke on the occasion but known of those speeches delivered the power that Dr. King’s’ I Have a Dream Speech,’ rendered. People stood and cheered in mesmerism as the eloquent words of the great civil rights leader echoed across the platform into the awareness of the international consciousness.

But as the dream been fulfilled? No! Not one hundred percent! Black and white children can join hands to a certain degree, at least in school. However, on an economic scale, black children still can’t hold hands together.

Another interesting part of this magnificent speech is a man being judge by the content of his character as opposed to the color of his skin.  When we look at the state of black men in America today, the dream appears to be an illusion.

More than half of black men are incarcerated. When they do get back out on the streets, the search for a descent job is very challenging. As a result, many young black men turn to a life of illegal hustle and crime to survive.

Civil Rights Movement: The Pinnacle of Black Unity

More than any time in history, the Civil Rights Movement brought blacks together on a major scale. And struggle appears to produce such reality. Blacks walked hand in hand for a single cause: for the obtainment of equal rights. However, since then, especially now, blacks appear to be less united on significant issues plaguing our communities and neighborhoods.

The “Black Lives Matter Movement,” only asserts itself when young black men die at the hands of white police officers. But the present day black struggle goes deeper than seeking justice against unjust law enforcement officers.

What about the poverty and crime-stricken neighborhoods and communities across America? The extreme economic oppression in the inner cities of Detroit and the outrageous violence in the inner-city streets of Chicago are a testament that black unity, as of today, isn’t a realty. Although there are well meaning African American leaders who speak out against poverty and crime, that is as far as it goes.

The March on Washington was revolutionary because of three reasons: it was the defining moment that brought international awareness to the black struggle in America, it established Dr. Martin Luther King, who introduced his famous “I Have a Dream Speech, “as the undisputed leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and the event representing the pinnacle of black unity.

The Black Struggle: International Awareness

Bringing attention to the Civil Rights Movement was the goal of the March on Washington. The overwhelming obstacles and challenges established by the unfair rules and regulations of White Americans hindered the potential for black progress and freedom.  Life for black people was filled with segregation, poverty, discrimination and a constant state of fear.

In places such as Mississippi and Birmingham Alabama, an extreme danger existed for African Americans at every turn. Blacks were still getting beaten, shot and lynched without any hope of justice from the white legal system.

The march on Washington brought shameful awareness on the unlawful issues perpetrated by people who had no respect for the part of humanity different from themselves.

Dr. Martin Luther King’s, “I Have a Dream Speech”

Many great speakers spoke on the occasion but known of those speeches delivered the power that Dr. King’s’ I Have a Dream Speech,’ rendered. People stood and cheered in mesmerism as the eloquent words of the great civil rights leader echoed across the platform into the awareness of the international consciousness.

But as the dream been fulfilled? No! Not one hundred percent! Black and white children can join hands to a certain degree, at least in school. However, on an economic scale, black children still can’t hold hands together.

Another interesting part of this magnificent speech is a man being judge by the content of his character as opposed to the color of his skin.  When we look at the state of black men in America today, the dream appears to be an illusion.

More than half of black men are incarcerated. When they do get back out on the streets, the search for a descent job is very challenging. As a result, many young black men turn to a life of illegal hustle and crime to survive.

Civil Rights Movement: The Pinnacle of Black Unity

More than any time in history, the Civil Rights Movement brought blacks together on a major scale. And struggle appears to produce such reality. Blacks walked hand in hand for a single cause: for the obtainment of equal rights. However, since then, especially now, blacks appear to be less united on significant issues plaguing our communities and neighborhoods.

The “Black Lives Matter Movement,” only asserts itself when young black men die at the hands of white police officers. But the present day black struggle goes deeper than seeking justice against unjust law enforcement officers.

What about the poverty and crime-stricken neighborhoods and communities across America? The extreme economic oppression in the inner cities of Detroit and the outrageous violence in the inner-city streets of Chicago are a testament that black unity, as of today, isn’t a realty. Although there are well meaning African American leaders who speak out against poverty and crime, that is as far as it goes.

Nothing significant has been done about it. No marches to bring international awareness to the black plight in inner cities. No unilateral confrontation of gangs and thug-ish-nism. Self- oppression via drugs, robberies, and shootings are destroying entire neighborhoods.

But where is the quest for change? What happened to the revolutionary marches that brought so much awareness to black issues?

Change and Revolution

The same passion for change during the Civil Rights Movement must be harnessed today. But this time the march and its revolutionary importance must be centered on ourselves (self-change) if we are to make any great progress as a people. “A people divided against themselves cannot stand.”

As long we refuse to confront our own problems or if we wait for some other race to come and clean up the inner cities, communities, and neighborhoods in which we live, the plea for change initiated by the Civil Rights Movement will never become a reality.

The reason for our failure will not be because white people held us back. No! The apparent reason for lack of progress will be because we, as a black people, through lack of trust and unity, sat back and watched as our youth, through crime and oppression, destroy the very communities which they grow from children to adults.

Civil Rights Movement as a Concept

The Civil Rights Movement didn’t end in the sixties for black people. The movement is a concept that must be adopted time and time again to bring awareness to issues which affect the African American community.

The Marches must be initiated again, starting locally, regardless of the cost. This time they must target the drug ridden problems and challenges of the inner-city as well as black on black crime. These are the issues which are leading to our own self-destruction as a people. Therefore, the revolution must be launched against ourselves.

All black leadership, movements, and ordinary black folk, including, fathers, mothers, and children, is to wake up and discover how our own selves are hindering our growth and power to contribute to society as a responsible people.

civil rights

Only then will the progress made during the Civil Rights Movement gather greater momentum for black people in America.

Nothing significant has been done about it. No marches to bring international awareness to the black plight in inner cities. No unilateral confrontation of gangs and thug-ish-nism. Self- oppression via drugs, robberies, and shootings are destroying entire neighborhoods.

But where is the quest for change? What happened to the revolutionary marches that brought so much awareness to black issues?

Change and Revolution

The same passion for change during the Civil Rights Movement must be harnessed today. But this time the march and its revolutionary importance must be centered on ourselves (self-change) if we are to make any great progress as a people. “A people divided against themselves cannot stand.”

As long we refuse to confront our own problems or if we wait for some other race to come and clean up the inner cities, communities, and neighborhoods in which we live, the plea for change initiated by the Civil Rights Movement will never become a reality.

The reason for our failure will not be because white people held us back. No! The apparent reason for lack of progress will be because we, as a black people, through lack of trust and unity, sat back and watched as our youth, through crime and oppression, destroy the very communities which they grow from children to adults.

Civil Rights Movement as a Concept

The Civil Rights Movement didn’t end in the sixties for black people. The movement is a concept that must be adopted time and time again to bring awareness to issues which affect the African American community.

The Marches must be initiated again, starting locally, regardless of the cost. This time they must target the drug ridden problems and challenges of the inner-city as well as black on black crime. These are the issues which are leading to our own self-destruction as a people. Therefore, the revolution must be launched against ourselves.

All black leadership, movements, and ordinary black folk, including, fathers, mothers, and children, is to wake up and discover how our own selves are hindering our growth and power to contribute to society as a responsible people.

Only then will the progress made during the Civil Rights Movement gather greater momentum for black people in America.

 

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